Ways to pay for long-term care

How to Cover Long-Term Care Expenses

Does planning for long-term care seem sensible for your retirement?

The answer: Many will not plan for an LTC until it is too late.

Where do you start?

Paying for Long-Term Care in Retirement

Each option has advantages and risks and knowing these will let you determine what your best plan of action is.

From Retirement Assets:

Without any coverage you will pay for LTC out-of-pocket. For most retirees, this is not the best option. If you are married, there is a good chance you and your spouse will both need long-term care. Essentially doubling your cost in LTC, you may consider shared care if you are married to save on costs.

Traditional Long-Term Care Insurance

This option is all-or-nothing. You either use the benefits or you do no end up using it. However, if you do not use the LTC insurance policy, your family/heirs do not typically see a death benefit payout. As a specialized insurance, you pay to have the insurance company cover out-of-pocket costs for long-term care. With the need for long-term care increasing, over the years policy holders have seen increases in premiums.

Life Insurance Policy with Chronic Care Rider

Life insurance can provide an upgrade. As part of your policy, many life insurance companies offer a rider that will help pay for long-term care. In the case you should need long-term care, your life insurance will pay out a fourth of the death benefit from your policy up to four years. Should you not use all the death benefit for your long-term care, your heirs will receive whatever remains after you pass.

These riders can also apply to permanent life insurance policies that will allow a portion of the policy to be invested; a portion that will grow and may be tax-free upon withdrawal.

Deferred-Income Annuities

While used more as a stream of income, deferred-income annuities may be used as monthly payments to offset the cost of long-term care. In some cases, you may be able to purchase a deferred-income annuity with long-term care coverage or a long-term care rider.

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underestimated retirement risk: medical costs

Do Not Forget Healthcare Costs When Retirement Planning

How are you to account for health care costs while retirement planning? Oftentimes, these expenses are underestimated. Even though Medicare Part A is free and covers hospitalization, the remainder of Medicare comes with premiums and the rest of health care and drug costs are out-of-pocket even with supplemental insurance.

Why are health care costs underestimated?

CPAs transitioning into retirement often do not consider that what they were paying in premiums is not the full amount. Thinking they need the same “take-home pay” folks forget that their employer was paying a good chunk of the premium costs when budgeting and the rest was coming directly out of their paychecks. Now, facing retirement, CPAs are responsible for out-of-pocket costs and the full premium.

Familiarization with Health Care Premiums

Having Medicare Part A helps immensely when it comes to health care costs, especially since it is free. However, you will be responsible for other premiums to help cover medical expenses.

  1. Medicare Part B: In 2022, premiums increased to $170.10 monthly. Note in the future this will increase.
  2. Medicare Supplemental Insurance: For coverage not offered through Part A or Part B of Medicare, supplemental insurance is available. This will help with medical expenses, but does not cover dental, hearing, or vision.
  3. Medicare Part C: Known as Medicare Advantage, these policies vary in coverage and price, but offer options including Part A, Part B, hearing, dental, and even vision. Furthermore, Part D (prescription drug coverage) is also included.
  4. Medicare Part D: As coverage for self-administrated prescription drugs, Part D requires a co-pay per prescription. Unfortunately, some drugs are not covered.
  5. Long-term care insurance premiums: Medicare only covers so much of long-term care costs after a certain amount of time, and even then, it will add up quickly daily. To make sure you are covered, building a LTC policy to your wants and needs is best. This is an important factor to consider for retirement planning because 70% of retirees experience a long-term care event.

How much could coverage and any out-of-pocket costs be then?

Knowing Total Health Care Costs

Adjusted for inflation, in 2021 multiple studies found that retirees were spending about $6200 on premiums and approximately $6500 on out-of-pocket costs for health care. For 2022, the projected amount for out-of-pocket costs is $7000. And with rising health care costs and inflation, the average expenses are predicted to increase by a minimum of $3500 by 2030.

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