Medicare 2023

2023 Means Savings on Medicare

Medicare beneficiaries will pay lower Part B premiums for coverage come 2023. Those who are paying these premiums need to be aware of two major changes.

For this upcoming year, the premium for Part B will decrease by 3% to $164.90. The annual deductible will also decrease from $233 to $226 for 2023.

Sometimes people do not know they are paying their Part B premiums because when you elect to enroll in Medicare, your premiums come directly out of your Social Security benefits.

Moreover, since CMS regulates Medicare Part D, even though the prescription coverage is sold by private insurances, there is a good chance that many will see a general decrease in Part D premiums, too. Unfortunately, since the private insurers set the terms and limits of these policies, there is not set amount for the decrease like Part B has. CMS is predicted that an almost 2% decrease may happen for Part D. If there is a change to your plan, you will receive a statement in the mail notifying you. If you do not receive any statement, please call your insurance directly or check online.

Lastly, another major change CMS announced were changes to income brackets and rates for the premium surtax for Medicare. This surtax is known as income-related monthly adjustment amount (IRMAA). This is in addition for higher income beneficiaries to the Part B base premium of $164.90 everyone pays. This also is an addition to Part D premiums for higher income beneficiaries.

This surtax is imposed on modified adjusted gross incomes starting at $97,000 for a single person and $194,000 for married couples who file a joint return and maxes out at $500,000 of MAGI for a single person and $750,000 for a married couple fling a joint return.  The maximum Part B premium if you hit the top income limits would be $560.50. For Part D the imposed surtax would be an additional maximum of $76.40. It is important to note that the highest bracket ($500,000/$750,000) discussed here is not adjusted for inflation, but the lower brackets are. So over time, more and more people will be moved into the top bracket and will pay the higher Medicare Part B premiums due to inflation.

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Medicare Mistakes That Could Uproot Your Retirement

Medicare is often the core health coverage for seniors during retirement. Knowing the ins and outs of the program is essential for your retirement finances. Following are some facts that may cause risks to arise in your retirement if not handled correctly.

Enrollment is not entirely free. Each part is broken down as follows:

Part A is typically free for seniors but has requirements for enrollment. This part is automatic and covers treatment in medical facilities.

 Part B costs and covers outpatient care and diagnostics. Much like Part A, Part B is automatic. Keeping premiums paid should be a priority in retirement.

Part C is Medicare Advantage, providing alternatives within the private sector. Plans vary based on state and individual needs.

Part D covers drugs prescriptions and has premiums.

However, with all health insurances, Medicare has deductibles, coinsurance, and copays that will impact your budget.

Be aware that price is not locked in the moment you begin Medicare coverage, Parts B & D will change yearly. This has the potential to affect your Social Security benefits. If you are signed up for monthly benefits, if Part B increases it will be deducted from your monthly check automatically. Now, you will not receive a lower monthly payment than you have if Part B increases—the cost adjustment is made with Social Security adjusts for cost-of-living.

Unfortunately, Medicare is only health care coverage—dental and eye are not included. Another common service/product not covered is hearing aids. If you would like that extra coverage, Part C, the private-sector market, is where you can group Part A, B & D together plus purchase plans with other coverage such as eye and dental. Otherwise, the services not covered are marked as out-of-pocket and may require you to use funds from an HSA or other retirement funds.

A huge factor with Medicare is enrollment timing. You have a seven-month span to enroll—three months before your 65th birthday to three months after that month. If you are unable to enroll during the original window, late penalties will be assessed to your Part B and Part D premiums indefinitely.

Having the information needed for success is important so you can make the right decisions for your retirement and health care needs. Medicare is a complicated government program that impacts your retirement head-on—sometimes even before you retire fully.

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